UI in iOS alerts and dialogs

Why do we perceive some applications as clear, organized, and easy to use? How to phrase UI content in a way that supports the overall style of the development platform? Well, I’ve learned some great points from a fascinating lecture given by Bohdan Hrechanovskyi –– MacPaw UX copywriter. Continue reading

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Doc your love: TechComm valentines

Are you in the mood for LOVE?
We wanted to make something special for you this year…

Share these valentines with your colleagues in techcomm to let them know just how much you appreciate them!

Cherish the docs guys 😉

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Empathy map: UX practice applied to TechComm

As the IT industry changes introducing new trends and searching to propose more value to a user, technical communication should adapt as well. Technical communicators start searching for better ways to present information and predict all pains to be resolved by the documentation.

One way of doing so is to look for some useful practices outside of technical communication domain. In this article, I would like to briefly introduce a visual practice of empathy mapping that can be adopted into technical communication.

Continue reading

Content Accessibility: Back to Basics

One of the many titles that we documentarians assume is user’s advocate. This means that we defend the user’s interests, cater for their information needs, and provide them with the right content at the right time. But what if some of them cannot read the help topic because the font is too small and light, or they cannot do a step in a procedure as the instructions are too vague? This means that probably, we have overlooked such thing as accessibility. Continue reading

The UA of the Future

We live in a rapidly changing technological world, and it’s no news that virtual, augmented, and mixed realities are gradually transitioning into mainstream usage. Chatbots bombard us from everywhere, and not just for fun—they reshape the way big companies do their businesses. AI and machine learning also drastically changed the game, as now we live along with self-driving cars, robots, face recognitions , and so on. And the predictions for 2018 are going into that direction even more.

Of course, the main reasons for such changes are always the same—better quality of services, higher customer satisfaction, and improved overall experience. In software development, those reasons are better user experience and assistance, as well as more intuitive design.

Nowadays, if you are not the first one to offer something new and innovative, you lose. And what about us, Technical Communicators? Does this mean that with perfect user assistance from the side of the application itself, the era of documentation has to end?

Of course it doesn’t. However, we cannot deny that things are changing and changing fast; the least we can do – be on the same track. Here is an article by Angel Lafchiev where you can find some interesting ideas on the future of user assistance and several pieces of advice on how not to fall out of this evolving tech world.

User Assistance: Resistance Is Futile, You Will Be Assimilated!

And a couple of things from myself.
I truly believe this is not end of an era of technical documentation at all, this is a new stage full of immense opportunities. Design and train chatbots, use VR/AR as an e-learning tool, create more personalised user assistance with the help of metadata and AI, and many more. This is only the beginning, and we, Technical Communicators, cannot miss it.