User assistance and accessibility

As an Information Developer, I often ask myself what our biggest fear is. In my opinion, that’s the fear to create useless technical content that no one reads, miscommunicate information, or fail to assist your readers when they need help the most. This fear may come true when we don’t analyze deep enough who our readers are, their needs, and how they access our content.

In this article, I would like to have a closer look at how writers create accessible content and a multisensory experience for readers with disabilities.

Continue reading

User experience in restaurants or keep your users in mind even at leisure time

Believe it or not, but an InfoDev at work is an InfoDev for life. As Information Developers, we perceive the world from the users’ perspective always questioning ourselves: “Is it clear enough? Can a procedure be shorter? Will that be understood globally?”
Sometimes, before you know it, you find yourself evaluating the user assistance in a 5-star hotel, scrutinizing an airport sign or a restaurant menu, and hunting for the ambiguous, the ineffective, and the incomprehensible with the noble intent to make a user experience smoother.

In this article, I will share my experience of reading the icons in a menu at one of the restaurants.

Continue reading

UX copywriting series. Dropbox feature descriptions

No matter what you’re writing—whether it’s a small tooltip or a long web article—you need to thoroughly check your writing before you publish it.

Good writing is not just about spelling, punctuation, and capitalization, though we definitely need to keep them in mind at all times, among like… a million other things.

During UI text review, InfoDevs point out things that non-professional writers would never think to think about. Today, I’d like to talk about the most typical things that we stumble upon during the UI text review.

2018-12-18_15-29-19

Brace yourselves – it’s going to be a long article but a 100% practical one and so worth a read! We’re going to discuss 6 reasons why Dropbox feature descriptions did not pass our UI text review.
2018-12-18_15-42-59
Continue reading

UX copywriting series. Action vs. non-action in app onboarding

Our first impression is often made up by how we are greeted for the first time. In apps, the conventional ‘hello, nice to meet you’ is its onboarding. But like with all conventional things, this is something that we tend to rush through, or even skip entirely.

For example, by the time I downloaded the Dropbox app, I already had a good experience with the web version. I was impatient to start using the app and decided to ignore the onboarding. Come on, Dropbox. You know me, I know you. It’s official—I have an account, after all. Let’s just get to business.

However, when I downloaded a mobile app that was relatively new for me—Inbox by Google—I did pay attention to the onboarding. And I stumbled… Continue reading

Guide to lightweight docs: layout & structuring tips

Reception of your content largely depends on the first impression that it creates for your audience. Within milliseconds of interaction with your document, your users decide whether this is an instruction that is likely to help them work or make their head hurt.

Discover a few simple illustrated tips on how to style your content in a modern and light way!

Continue reading

Empathy map: UX practice applied to TechComm

As the IT industry changes introducing new trends and searching to propose more value to a user, technical communication should adapt as well. Technical communicators start searching for better ways to present information and predict all pains to be resolved by the documentation.

One way of doing so is to look for some useful practices outside of technical communication domain. In this article, I would like to briefly introduce a visual practice of empathy mapping that can be adopted into technical communication.

Continue reading

Content Accessibility: Back to Basics

One of the many titles that we documentarians assume is user’s advocate. This means that we defend the user’s interests, cater for their information needs, and provide them with the right content at the right time. But what if some of them cannot read the help topic because the font is too small and light, or they cannot do a step in a procedure as the instructions are too vague? This means that probably, we have overlooked such thing as accessibility. Continue reading

hogwarts houses

User behavior types vs. Hogwarts houses

Earlier this year, I wrote several articles on how to document user personas, Hogwarts style.

Like, there are Gryffindorian how-to steps 1-2-3 good to go pal whoo-hoo you’re done! Or, you can have this very thorough, do-it-at-your-own-pace Hufflepuff tutorials with follow-up tasks that guarantee to put you on your feet. For our Slythery audience, we offer several quick&dirty pro tips, no bull. And yeah, Ravenclaw guys, those appendixes with super-tricky scenarios are for you.

…what a mess of styles, huh? 🙂 Anyhow, choose your house, and I’ll tell you more about what docs you’d enjoy!

https://informaze.wordpress.com/2016/03/02/user-behavior-types-vs-hogwarts-houses-part-1/ https://informaze.wordpress.com/2016/03/16/user-behavior-types-vs-hogwarts-houses-part-2/ https://informaze.wordpress.com/?p=1178&preview=true https://informaze.wordpress.com/2016/04/06/user-behavior-types-vs-hogwarts-houses-ravenclaw/

On the hush-hush side, I would love to write in an individual fun way for each of those houses. But since my invitation to Hogwarts has not arrived (yet!), for now, I am a Technical Communicator for enterprise software.

So, welcome to my world of neutral writing where jokes are not allowed.

Continue reading