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Information Architecture for the World Wide Web

Fellows – Information Developers, Technical Communicators, Information Experts – lend me your ears.
When designing knowledge bases, creating documentation portals, or documenting complex interrelations, one forgotten requirement may result in multiple very memorable working evenings.
Consider this precious advice from Peter Morville and Louis Rosenfeld and always pay heed to these crucial areas.

In short, we need to understand the business goals behind the web site and the resources available for design and implementation. We need to be aware of the nature and volume of content that exists today and how that might change a year from now. And we must learn about the needs and information-seeking behaviors of our major audiences. Good information architecture design is informed by all three areas.

Explore their book Information Architecture for the World Wide Web Peter for more useful tips!

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Future starts now?

Most of our clients’ needs have gone way beyond traditional single-sourcing scheme: write once, generate different outputs in different formats. Don’t get me wrong, we still are the proud owners of User Manuals and Help Systems. But.

Meeting the business demands, the companies have developed an internet of systems that require sophisticated and strategic information management from us, information professionals: CRM, Feedback Management, Support Center, Help Systems, Knowledge Base, embedded user assistance, and packages of miscellaneous documentation.

That’s the reality, but what’s next? The amount of the information is exciting, and some experts envisage that the excitement will turn into shock pretty soon.

The article written by Ray Gallon and Andy McDonald lets you visualize the information management and helps stay prepared.

Meet and greet – age of molecular information is here?

An eye for an eyepatch: pirate’s guide to content strategy

To all my underappreciated hard-working
InfoDevs in the world, I dedicate this
dead man’s chest of doc cases.
And a bottle of rum. Harr!

‘No one ever reads documentation, why bother with it?’

Favorite opening line of any techie, heard every time when I introduce myself as an Information Developer. I hope I don’t burn in hell when I say that more often than not, I as an Information Developer agree.

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100 Things Information Developer Should Do in the Lifetime

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away…

…a small group of information developers decided to create a repository of their knowledge and experience, the temple of the interesting facts gathered from the corners of the technical communication world, the maze that should lead others to the informational enlightenment – the Informaze blog. They planted a tiny seed and now they can witness their blog growing high and fast like a huge beautiful tree. Each blogpost on Informaze is carefully and tenderly grown by the information developers like an apple by the gardeners. Today we have 100 fruits on the tree of knowledge – 100 articles on Informaze!

In the 100th article, I’ve decided to accumulate the most essential elements of the “true information developer”, and find out what we should do in the lifetime to have an honor of calling ourselves “masters of information”.

Are you ready to remind yourself what a long, exiting, and breathtaking maze you go through every day? Continue reading

Professional habits in personal life

We spend at work most of our time, and it happens, as a matter of fact, that professional habits penetrate deeply into our personal life. Accountants are usually exceptionally careful and vigilant with their own finances; lawyers can use their skills and knowledge of law in arguments with annoying neighbors; doctors constantly give pieces of advice about treating all kinds of health conditions to their family, friends and acquaintances. On the one hand, such professional attitude appears to be natural, but on the other hand, it just makes people feel slightly uncomfortable.

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MMoS vs Apple Style Guide: User interface

The idea of this post has been lingering in my mind for quite a long time. Having created documentation according to the Microsoft Manual of Style (MMoS) in the majority of my projects, I was puzzled a bit when I started investigating the Apple Style Guide. Not for the obvious reasons like structure differences, or depth of topics covered, or style of writing but for the small discrepancies like spelling or wording that were crucial nonetheless.

Having exclaimed “I need to write that down!” for the fifth time, I decided to make a side-by-side comparison of the guidelines proposed by both MMoS and Apple Style Guide.

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